Blog Archives

Point de la Mort: Nouveau – WWII Render

Derived from the post “Point de la Mort: World War II,” I developed artistically rendered this photograph to alter its tone and pave the way for a future use, perhaps as a book or short story cover (War at Our Doorstep, for example). The iMac’s Preview application has been invaluable for such tweaking.

Normandy Cannon (PNG Image)

“During World War 2, these cannons were more than menacing. Having significant range to fire upon the beaches a substantial few miles away, the man operating this machine of death could be almost completely disconnected from the battle at hand.” This render was cropped and meddled with until it had the color and tone I had been hoping to establish.

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A Parisian Medley: Photographie

Rouen-Giverny (PNG Image)

A photographic medley of France. I incorporated flowers from Monet’s Garden in Giverny and the memorial cross of Joan of Arc in Rouen. ©2012 Zechariah Barrett – All Rights Reserved.

Rosehip Country

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This photograph is the "counterpart" of "Reminisicent Rosehip Country," featuring the memorial in question.

Reminisicent Rosehip Country

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Long rows of rosehips extend from this Normandy road to a World War II memorial, commemorating the 1st Infantry Division.

Miscellaneous Gallery: Outlandish Art Among Modern Artifices (and is that a bird I spy?)

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Historical Artifact or Modern Artifice?

As you may stipulate from my previous works, this is indeed the latter entitlement – a modern artifice. The original photograph of this bunker was taken during October 2010 (of which I am the photographer), and adjusted to appear much older than it really is.

For once, you can figure out how I did it!

On one side you’ll see the photograph in question, on the other is the color / effects manager of iMac’s Preview application. As one of Sherlock Holmes’ deductive observations, it does not appear as impressive a work when you realize how it was created so simply. Elementary!

It's an artifice all right. The photograph was taken of a WWII bunker in Normandy, France (as usual).

A similar effect was applied to my photograph of an old fashioned cash register, though with the addition of sepia tone and some other various tweaking’s.

Kansas City Photography-AW[RZ]

This is an interesting graphic I developed using a photograph I captured in Kansas City. I attempted to turn the very modern and colorful image into an older rendition of itself.

Jolly good show? Why not try it out yourself?

Nearly any graphics program will do – all you need is a suitable photograph.

For now, adieu – it would seem lunch is calling.

-Adventure Writer’s Blog

Old Fashioned Rendering

Kansas City Photography-AW[RZ]

This is an interesting graphic I developed using a photograph I captured in Kansas City. I attempted to turn the very modern and colorful image into an older rendition of itself.

Le Mont: Flamboyant or Subdued?

Lately I’ve been meddling in saturation – enhancing the colors in many of my photographs with, on average, fairly positive results. I’ve learned many photographs don’t need saturation, since their original quality has a certain charm to it. Photographs such as Charlemagne: Notre Dame de Paris or The Blazing Hues already embody their own personality and don’t really need any enhancement.

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Here is one such photograph with which I have meddled. It certainly has a much more dramatic quality than it's original, with profound rather than subdued colors. Although I must say I rather prefer the subdued in many cases.

 

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The original, unaltered photograph and another of my "on the move" compositions, captured in a moving vehicle (growing ever closer to the renowned Saint Michel).

European Cathedral

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This photograph was taken in a moving car, which explains some of the blur. I used one of the built in iMac graphics programs to increase sharpness and give it a sepia tone.

Speaking of Charlemagne…

Here’s a few more historical figures you might recognize…

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