Blog Archives

Omaha Beach: A Broader View

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A side of Omaha Beach not often seen, depicting another less-photographed area of the cemetery.

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More Six-Word Stories

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Taken in Omaha Beach: Normandy, France

One War, One Writ, One Nation.

The American Cemetery
The American Cemetery for WWII Soldiers in France

One savior, one cross – eternally free.

WWII Tidbits: Omaha Beach Cemetary

Gazing at Time Long Past

Q: What did the grounds around Omaha Beach look like before now, during WWII? A: Before it was devoid of trees, devoid of any cover and they were just trench systems firing down onto the beach. We'll walk into the cemetery first, then walk around where we can find a better idea of that. -British Tour Guide: Normandy, France And that we will... in photographs and additional WWII Tidbits!

The Story of General McNair (WWII Tidbits)

General McNaire was a senior officer of American forces in Europe and he had a lovely office in London. 25th of July was the Operation Cobra – the big breakout through Maroney, and he thought, I think I’m going to see the boys go into action. So he went upon to the front line and the plan for Cobra was that they would withdraw American forces from their front line, for safety, about a thousand yards. And then bomb the German frontline about a mile long, along the Parisian low road. So they did all that and took the American forces out of the front line and brought over a load of bombers, they liked bombing, and dropped the bombs straight onto the American forces, and killed four hundred American soldiers. Not the first and only time, there’s nothing new about that. But poor old McNair was one of them. So instead of sitting out the war in his office, he now joined [the soldiers at the Omaha Beach cemetery].

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Grave of General Lesley J. McNair - Omaha, Beach

World War II Tidbits

Over the next few days I’ll post some World War II “tidbits” – photographs and the stories behind them.

Today, the Location is: Omaha, Beach, Subject: Jewish Soldiers.

“[Out of] the British and Canadians, a few were Jewish. / On your dog tag they always showed your religion, but they would change the name of a Jew, particularly Jews who had escaped to occupied Europe. They used to change their name to a very English name, and would give them another religion. [In case] they were captured. But the American forces didn’t do that. And I brought a couple of Israelis here not so long ago and asked them about this (indicates pebble upon Jewish grave marker). Putting a stone on their [marker]. And I thought it was to show that someone just visited the grave, but it’s just a sort of act of earth to earth, dust to dust, ashes to ashes. And it’s a tradition in Israel – the Jewish faith. You make some little marker.” –Tour Guide

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The grave marker of an American soldier with the Jewish faith, indicated upon and by the design of his marker.

Photo Journal: Lines

From the Weekly Photo Challenge comes the prompt, Lines.

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Taken in Omaha Beach: Normandy, France

Le Chant des Parisiens (The Song of Parisians)

Our first video-blog post!

Composed below is a collection of photographs captured around various regions of France and mouse-clicked for this video. The accompanying music is The Bells of St. Anne de Beaupre, performed by Paul Pitman from Musopen.org: the Public Domain music collection site.

Omaha Beach

The American Cemetery

The American Cemetery for WWII Soldiers in France

Omaha Beach is a solemn experience… hearing the stories of brave soldiers who risked their lives for our country. It is a place where silence is golden… and the signs [one sign, asking visitors to be respectful and silence] even tell you so.

The MG Zinia

Say “Hello” to the Zinias of Monet’s Garden. These will be our last of the Monet’s Garden entries, until we cover a few major tourist hotspots.

(Such as the Eiffel Tower, Notre Dame, Alexander the Great’s Bridge, a tour of the Seine River, Omaha Beach, and more…!)

Soleil Rouge

A striking blend of various purples, pinks, whites, and violets.

Starting this month…

Location of France

Image via Wikipedia

…I’ll be going on a 10-day trip to France, entailing such things as… boulangeries, WWII monuments, parisian dining, chateau’s, and a lot of scenery.

Be sure to check out my blog after October 15th for lengthy reviews, descriptions, and many photographs of France!