Blog Archives

Idyllic Mountainside: Lifeblood of the Land

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Trees – lifeblood of the land, they are often what make scenic views so idyllic. A farmhouse under the shade of maples, oaks, or scattered birch, an exotic jungle untouched by industry, the plains of Ireland with a few here and there which the sheep pass by, a mountainside covered in vibrant green with wide open sky. These most common features of nature are what I believe instill the beauty that may be found in this composition.

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Off to see the family…

Louisiana state welcome sign Panneau de Bienve...

Image via Wikipedia

In a few days I’ll be off to see some family members that have just come up from Louisiana, and I won’t have the chance to do any blogging! Therefore, tomorrow I’ll be preparing a set of posts that will automatically publish each day until I’m back. Maybe I’ll even have time to throw in a review or two! Feel free to post comments on any of my posts, I’ll approve (or disapprove, in the case of spam) and respond accordingly when I get back!

X-Men First Class Review: Tomorrow?

Sufficient for the day is its own trouble…

and if I do not have a great deal of trouble tomorrow, I’ll be posting a review of X-Men: First Class! This will mark my first “in-depth” review. Look for it!

The movie has given a decent impression from the previews, and I dearly hope it matches up, or rather surpasses the previous X-Men films. We shall see! And a very happy early birthday to one of my elementary-school-childhood friends who will be celebrating tomorrow.

The Story of General McNair (WWII Tidbits)

General McNaire was a senior officer of American forces in Europe and he had a lovely office in London. 25th of July was the Operation Cobra – the big breakout through Maroney, and he thought, I think I’m going to see the boys go into action. So he went upon to the front line and the plan for Cobra was that they would withdraw American forces from their front line, for safety, about a thousand yards. And then bomb the German frontline about a mile long, along the Parisian low road. So they did all that and took the American forces out of the front line and brought over a load of bombers, they liked bombing, and dropped the bombs straight onto the American forces, and killed four hundred American soldiers. Not the first and only time, there’s nothing new about that. But poor old McNair was one of them. So instead of sitting out the war in his office, he now joined [the soldiers at the Omaha Beach cemetery].

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Grave of General Lesley J. McNair - Omaha, Beach

WordPress Dashboard Gone Buggy!

Suppose we’ll have to wait till’ tomorrow for our usual posts. Anyone else having this dilemma?

Buggy HTML Dashboard

The One Thing EVERY Writer Needs

My Idea Boxes

Idea Boxes

When I read Erica Johnson’s, or rather, Shari Lopatin’s10 Reasons Every Writer Should Keep an Idea Box, it made me think for a bit – even to the point of considering buying my own “idea box” from Barnes and Noble (and I found the one mentioned here). Then I recalled my suitcase, my 3DS, my blog, and the many other places I store my ideas – they were all idea boxes, simply not consolidated into a singular medium.

My Suitcase – I started using my suitcase when the clusters of papers scattered around my room became overwhelming. The folders within helped me to separate each of my writing projects into organized categories, and I could fit a few pens here and there for use on the go, with easily accessible sheets of paper in the two end-side binders.

My 3DS –Who would have thought my Nintendo 3DS would actually help me

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My Nintendo 3DS

along in my writing? In addition to it’s internet browser, and plethora of apps, there is a program called “Game Notes” – which I have found to be invaluable in the past few months. My latest writing project has produced a variety of random ideas which beg to jotted down immediately. If I feel the idea slipping away, faster than my hand can write, I record it on the 3DS Sound Program, essentially explaining the idea to myself when I need to recall it later.

My Blog – Although I don’t traditionally use my blog for storing ideas regarding fictional mediums, I do find it imperative for allocating my blog ideas for dates that I am lacking in creativity. In the drafts section of my dashboard I find this solace, and there I store my many brainstorms – good and bad, for potential future use or deletion.

My Notebooks – In the area of stationaries, I am certainly not lacking! And, in the long run, they are definitively the most vital in recording my thoughts and conveying bursts of inspiration, especially those which make themselves out to be quite lengthy. I’ve written entire manuscripts in my notebooks, and I can always return to them when I wish to review, with a hint of nostalgia, how my writing has exponentially developed. Unlike a computer, they cannot crash or catch viruses, though I can certainly lose them! This is why I store the majority of my idea-books on a shelf in my bedroom, easily found and kept track of, even with my INFP unorganized personality.

My Computer – Aside from my blog, I tend to use computers as an archive of my thought processes. Generally for the purpose of temporarily storing and printing out my final drafts (which find their way to my suitcase – if I don’t give in to my unorganized tendencies)

My Mind – The most unreliable finds itself to be my first and last resort. When I have an idea, I make certain to record it into one of the above mediums, but if I (for some odd reason) find myself without, then I attempt to store it in my brain by memorization. “Make the character do this… Make the character do this… Make the character do this… What did I want the character to do again? Oh yes! Make the character do this…” Even though I have a keen memory, I don’t always maintain the best concentration when other, more important thoughts, bring themselves to center stage.

What is Your Writing Box?

Do you rely on the ole’ noggin, or go digital with an iTouch, iPad, Droid, or other high-end technologies? Whatever the case, I most certainly agree with Shari Lopatin- keeping a writing box (or boxes), in it’s many forms, altogether calls for and develops observation, authorial solidification, unique perspectives, annihilating boredom, instills importance, literary diversity, and a most fun experience (most certainly instead of fumbling around for an idea you have hopelessly forgotten).

If you don’t have one and you call yourself a writer – get one! You won’t regret it. My idea boxes have helped me to grow and mature as a writing, fine tuning my skills by learning from my mistakes and gain innovative perspective and experience. Inspiration may strike from the slightest of ideas, and by writing one down, you may find yourself one day with a bestselling novel in your hands.

10 Things to Do This Summer

Wheat in the Hulah valley, 2007

Image via Wikipedia

In response to today’s Daily Post topic, here’s some things I plan to do this summer (in no particular order).

1. Read: Lots and lots of books

2. Finish writing my book

3. Exhaustively revise my book

4. Attain a copyright registration for my book

5. Locate an agent

6. Strike a deal and publish my book

7. Review upcoming films

8. Spend time with friends and family

9. Review up and coming novels

10. Make it through summer with the WP Post-A-Day 2011 Challenge!

AW Blog comes to Twitter

Free twitter bar

Image via Wikipedia

A few months ago I linked the Adventure Writer Blog up with Twitter account AW Blog. Now, utilizing WordPress’ new Twitter interface, I’ve added a Twitter widget on the sidebar! Want to add your own? Simply select the new Twitter app under your Widgets, and customize it!

Kung-Fu Panda 2

Kung Fu Panda film poster, with Po in the middle.

Image via Wikipedia

Everybody’s favorite Kung-Fu fighting panda returns in this latest film! And although the film is the second highest grossing in the United States, the inevitable question must be asked: did DreamWorks make the cut in meeting fan’s expectations with this sequel, or did they fall short?

The film starts with a history of its primary antagonist – Lord Shen, heir to throne in Gongmen City, and a dastardly peacock with plans for world domination (or at least all of China). He has taken the beloved recreational firework and turned it into a destructive weapon of war, yet he does not stop with this apparently inexcusable act.. After learning of a prophecy told by his parent’s soothsayer that he will one day be thwarted by a black and white warrior, he ascertains a team of wolves and makes a mass genocide of the panda species – gaining the attention of his parents who banish him after learning of his evil deeds. Enraged, he takes over the royal palace (which has now come under the control of Kung Fu masters Thundering Rhino, Storming Ox, and Croc) a short time later (once his parents have died of grief), using his firework cannon to defeat the legendary Kung-Fu masters – exterminating Rhino, and locking Ox and Croc in the dungeon.

After the brief introduction, we join Po, the Dragon Warrior, on a fairly usual day. After some training with Shifu (pay close attention, as the particular move he is taught will become a pivotal point in the film) Po joins the Furious Five on a mission to town where wolf bandits are stealing all the metal they can find in order to mass-produce cannons for Lord Shen. While fighting, Po sees a “vision of the past,” incurred from a symbol he spots on the head bandit’s sleeve – portraying his birth mother and father, and a great fire seeming to envelope them. While thus distracted, Po is knocked down and the bandits flee into the mountains with a fair amount of the metal. When the warriors arrive back home, Shifu briefly tells them of the attack on the Kung-Fu masters (shown at the beginning of the film), before sending them out on a mission to defeat Lord Shen. All the while, Po remains in great complexion over his past, at one time inquiring of his goose father, Mr. Ping, “where he came from.” When the warriors arrive at the city and encounter Lord Shen, they found themselves poorly equipped, and nearly defeated. The future seems dim for Gongmen City, but there is hope on the horizon if Po can master “inner peace,” and grow as the Dragon Warrior.

From a family perspective, the movie is quite enjoyable! Suitable for a variety of ages, with content fitting for each. The violence and images are about at par with the first movie, never displaying blood and gore, though with evident death. The movie is rated PG and should be reserved for kids beyond their toddler years, around 6-10+. From a Christian perspective, the movie is abounding with philosophy from Eastern religions, entailing inner peace and other such conceptions – Bhuddist philosophies which have been been pointed out by a recent Freshly Pressed post. The lessons within the movie must be taken with spiritual discernment – having confidence in oneself is a must, however, having foremost trust and confidence in God and His Son is vital. The world we live in now is not an illusion – we have been created and placed here for a purpose and given free will to choose. We have been made for love – to have passion for our God and passion for his work. We are not good in and of ourselves, we find righteousness in the process of sanctification – following God and defying self through the power of the Holy Spirit given us.

Kung Fu Pand 2: Review Coming Up!

Look out for the Kung-Fu Panda II: Kaboom of Doom review sometime tomorrow! If you’re unfamiliar with the Dreamwork’s series, be sure to check out my review on the first film: Kung Fu Panda.

Thanks for reading! -Adventure Writer